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ODR CME

The Virginia Supreme Court has approved the development of a technology course to add to the menu of training for mediators certified to accept court-referred cases in Virginia.

The CME (continuing mediation education) course will, in the words of the Supreme Court mandate: “provide training on how to use electronic tools such as e-mail, Drop-Box, and other file sharing tools in an ethical manner that ensures preservation of confidentiality of information both during and after the mediation. . . . [and] may be expanded to summarize issues surrounding online dispute resolution, the way in which artificial intelligence can support Online Dispute Resolution (ODR), and the ethical considerations associated with both. Depending on responses to the CMEs, the module also may be included in the mandatory training mediators must undergo in order to be certified as court-referred mediators.”

As a member of the SRL Committee I suggested the development of the course, and I am a member of the sub-committee that will develop and test the module. Although some state bar associations have made technology training mandatory for lawyers, to my knowledge this will be the first ODR/technology course endorsed as a mediation CLE by a state supreme court in the US.

13
Jul 2019
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InternetBar.Org “Member of the Month”

Some very kind words from Jeff Aresty .

12
Jul 2019
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Latin America

In September, Ana Maria Goncalves and I will host a course consisting of a series of webinars and online exercises leading to a certificate of completion in e-mediation. The course will be offered in Portuguese and English simultaneously. The English langauge flyer can be found here: E-Mediation.

By September or October Alberto Elisavetsky’s new book, “La mediacion a la luz de las nuevas technologias” (Mediation in Light of New Technologies) should also be published. Alberto asked me to write a short blurb on the future of ODR, which can be found in English and Spanish here: ODR.

14
Jun 2019
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SMU ODR Class

A terrific group for the ODR class at SMU – we finish the class tomorrow, if we don’t get swept away by the torrential rain and winds.
18
May 2019
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Today my colleagues and I presented the white paper on digital identity – here’s a link to the paper: DID

01
May 2019
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WJF – Digital Identity For Refugees

Next week my colleagues and I will roll out a new White Paper on the creation of internationally operable standards for digital identities that can begin the process of bringing the millions of stateless refugees out of ‘invisibility.’ The event will be held at the offices of Eleven publishers and will be a co-celebration of the 6th year of the International Journal of Online Dispute Resolution, of which I am one of the co-Editors-in-Chief.

25
Apr 2019
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ODR Forum Blog #2: ODR and Access to Justice

 

My second post in the ODR Forum blog just went up – you can find it here:  ODR & A2J

13
Mar 2019
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E-Mediation

 

Ana Goncalves and I have an article in the upcoming edition of the IJODR – “Standards, Qualifications, and Certification for E-Mediators.”  The article is based on information generated by the ODR committee of the International Mediation Institute (of which Ana and I were the Co-Chairs), and presented at the International ODR Forum in New Zealand.  Here is a link to the article:  EMediation Standards

11
Mar 2019
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AI and the Law

This afternoon I will present a short talk on ODR and Access to Justice at the AI and the Law Symposium at American University College of Law.  This is an annual event that brings justices from Brazil to DC for surveys of developments in US law and the courts.  It’s not connected to the training and presentations I did in Brazil back in November, but it seems I can’t escape Portuguese translators.  Thanks to Judge Peter Messitte for the invitation.  A copy of the power point I’ll use can be found here:  AI and A2J

A greatly edited (and shorter) version of the presentation is available in audio with the power points at:  Recording

07
Mar 2019
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ODR Forum Blog #1 – Why ODR Now?

The NCSC has established a blog to lead up to the International ODR Forum in Williamsburg in October.  They have invited everyone to contribute to the blog with short notes and commentary about ODR, and during the run up to the ODR Forum there will be many blog entries, and many topics explored on a variety of subjects related to online dispute resolution.  One thing about which I think most of us who deal with ODR would agree is that the idea of, and the reality of, ODR has been expanding rapidly in the last couple of years. Why now?

For the past two decades ODR has been acknowledged as an approach to disputes, but it seems that ODR has in the past year or two been on the tongues of dispute resolvers in just about every mode and venue.  It is the classic example of an “overnight success” that is anything but overnight.

ODR’s first blooming began in the 1990’s in e-commerce, addressing the bounded universe of disputes there with algorithms and online work by “real” mediators.  What we are seeing now is the blooming of ODR in the courts, for what I suggest are much the same reasons that we saw ODR being developed in e-commerce. The courts offer huge numbers of cases, many of which are bounded by forms, rules, and processes that lend themselves to assistance by algorithm driven ODR platforms.  The payoffs in saved time and saved money are also analogous to the payoffs in e-commerce. The promise of those payoffs in the court systems around the world are, I think, driving the emergence of ODR beyond e-commerce. There are two areas in which I still don’t see a lot of progress in ODR.

First, we are not seeing yet the development of a true justice layer for the Internet.  In the “real” world we interact in a social layer and a commercial layer, with a justice layer available to resolve disputes created by our social and commercial interactions.  That justice layer is driven by venue, standing, and rules that recognize borders. On the internet we have an active social layer (perhaps too active) and a commercial layer, but no real justice layer that operates in the cyber-world we have created with our online social and commercial interactions.  The closest we’ve come to a justice layer of the Internet are the private justice systems created by e-commerce platforms, joined and ruled by the the fine print behind the “I Agree” button that we click almost automatically. The court ODR that is being developed is, at least at this point, not revolutionary.  Court ODR has, so far, taken the traditional functions and structures of court systems and converted them or adjusted them to the use of online tools. And, significantly, the court ODR platforms are designed to operate within the same venues, and with the same borders, that control non-ODR court processes. The EU has taken small steps to stretch ODR across borders (although the idea of borders in the EU are not, themselves, traditional).  But the major attempt to create an agreement about how to handle cross border disputes not managed as a private justice system, the UNCITRAL ODR Working Group, basically failed.

Second, we are not yet seeing ODR platforms in widespread use for sole practitioner dispute resolvers or for small firms and non-profits without the financial resources or the case loads to support large scale ODR platforms.  Even though most dispute resolvers are using technology to some degree, it is probably the case that most do not think of their use of mobile phones, document sharing platforms, and, heaven forbid, e-mail, as ODR. The gap in the market seems to be for ODR platforms with secure document handling and storage, designed for dispute resolution, with the ability to communicate, brainstorm, and create agreements that are user friendly and cheap enough to be used by those who are not operating in large e-commerce or court systems.

07
Feb 2019
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